“Live to Be 100” — You Can Do It!

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Dr. William House with Tracy Husted, the first pre-school-age child to receive a cochlear implant.

Dr. William House with Tracy Husted, the first pre-school-age child to receive a cochlear implant.

“Have a happy heart.” To touch those of you who have heard this phrase before already know the answer, but you’ve got to do everything as soon as possible to catch up, for time’s wasting, so don’t delay. By popular demand we are sharing a wonderful article from an interview in our files, because it’s still news. So listen up and hear once again how to stay young and healthy, most importantly with a happy heart.

“A heart in 70 years does the equivalent work of lifting an airplane carrier out over the ocean. There are 60,000 miles of pipelines we call capillaries and arteries in our body and our heart beats at 60 times per minute.” So said German born Dr. Eric Koster when we met and spoke with the brilliant and dedicated doctor a number of years back. At the time, Dr. Koster was one of the foremost authorities on heart disease and cancer research in the United States.

Dr. Koster discussed the heart disuse and disease. “We need something to cool the engine, meaning the heart. We have the same air pouches that birds have to collect water vapors in our own air pouches, but we don’t use them enough with correct breathing!”

How to keep a healthy heart? Use olive oil, it’s the best of the oils and is great for cholesterol, and don’t use margarine, because the coloring is generally a coal tar product; a few raw almonds before a meal are very good for you, and don’t eat those animal fats either: ice cream, pastries, rich desserts – all sound yummy good, but are bad. Last, but not least, according to Dr. Koster, is to rest a little after each meal and make sure you get plenty of exercise; walking is good and you’ll really have a healthy heart.

Having a hearing problem? Here’s more research this writer has in her memory files for suffering from a hearing disorder or loss of hearing, which prompted this writer to visit the House Ear Institute that has brought back many memories when once, Dr. Howard took me on a tour of his wonderful but small “House Institute” as it was named at the time. Today the institute has changed names and is now grown into the beautiful Howard Research Institute that is as modern as they come in today’s world and has grown from a rented one person office to a five story (state of the art) building that employs over 180 staff members and still remains non-profit.

All the advancements Dr. House had told me he was making to improve one’s hearing loss has by today’s standards turned into something really big. I remember him showing me all around his institute and now to think that all these many years later he is still considered to be the father of modern otology. The House Ear Institute developed the cochlear implant as well as the auditory brain stem implant.

Dr. House perfected many crucial otologic surgery procedures, in particular the fenestration operation in the 1940s and the stapedectomy surgery. He performed over 30,000 procedures that resulted in restoration for those affected by otosclerosis.

Dr. House is recognized for his treatment to President Ronald Reagan, actors Bob Hope and James Stewart, as well as many other notables.

Originally Dr. House told me he was interested in plastic surgery, but after observing Dr. Julius Lempert perform delicate surgery through the ear canal, he decided the “restoration of such an important sense as hearing was more important than having a good-looking nose.” So, after graduating from the USC School of Medicine, Dr. House began his own practice concentrating on the ears, which in return set into motion the huge advancements he made as well as establishing his non-profit institute, located on the House Research Institute Campus at 2100 W. 3rd St. in Los Angeles.

So, if you’d like to live to be 100, here are two exceptional examples of the many great doctors who have paved the way to our longevity. “You can do it!”

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