“Scarecrow”

Cally (Linda Tomassone), torn between the manipulations of her mother Rose (Deborah Lemen) and the promises of a new life by lover Nick (Ian Jerrell), attempts to free herself from the evil that is the “Scarecrow.”

Cally (Linda Tomassone), torn between the manipulations of her mother Rose (Deborah Lemen) and the promises of a new life by lover Nick (Ian Jerrell), attempts to free herself from the evil that is the “Scarecrow.”

Scarecrow explores the fragile framework of our consciousness and how it can be damaged by relentless fear. The premise is simplistic enough but its undercurrent is bold and unyielding. It is ambitious yet sedated. The story is of Cally (a charismatic Linda Tomassone) who lives with her mother Rose (Deborah Lemen, a very apt performance) on a secluded farm. They are outcasts. They live on the edge on an already remote rural area. Being cut off from society has made Rose paranoid and strange. Such loneliness that Cally feels is fuel for dark forces that seem to gather in the adjacent cornfield.
Closely analogous to Eden’s garden, enter the ominous scarecrow (Ian Jerrell) who lures Cally away from the safety of home and the burdensome constraints of Rose. He is handsome, alluring and lethal. The question remains, is he for real? Or just a projection of Rose’s basic fears? Is what he represents so threatening that his mere presence alters a family’s continuation?
Director Antony Berrios keeps it simple stage, emphasizing a course house and cornfield. A projection screen was cleverly utilized showing the audience Cally’s departure from her world of restriction to one of liberty and danger. The honest performances were hampered by a script that couldn’t decide between being American Gothic or modern horror. You decide. Recommended.

Cally (Linda Tomassone), torn between the manipulations of her mother Rose (Deborah Lemen) and the promises of a new life by lover Nick (Ian Jerrell), attempts to free herself from the evil that is the “Scarecrow.”


Tagged as: